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Egyptian Hand Painted Papyrus

 
The following Egyptian art is made from genuine Egyptian papyrus and hand painted a unique Egyptian design. All papyrus paintings can be purchased in the Egyptian Dreams shop and are of the highest quality. Click on an image to visit the shop.

Hand painted papyrus of the Final Judgement
Hand Painted Papyrus of the Final Judgement

The ancient Egyptians believed that, when they died, they would be judged on their behaviour during their lifetime before they could be granted a place in the Afterlife. This judgement ceremony was called the Weighing of the Heart. The ceremony was believed to have been performed in front of Osiris, the chief god of the dead and the Afterlife, and a tribunal of 42 dieties. A giant scale would weigh the deceased's heart against the principle of truth and justice (maat), represented by a feather, the symbol of the goddess of truth, order and justice, Maat. If the heart balanced against the feather then the deceased would be granted a place in the Fields of Hetep and Iaru. If it was heavy with the weight of wrongdoings, the balance would sink, and the heart would be grabbed and devoured by a terrifying beast that sat ready and waiting by the scales. This beast was Ammit ('the gobbler'), a composite animal with the head of a crocodile, the front legs and body of a lion or leopard and the back legs of a hippopotamus. Once the heart was devoured, the deceased would cease to exist - an idea which terrified the ancient Egyptians.


Hand Painted Papyrus of Gods and Goddesses
Hand Painted Papyrus of Gods and Goddesses

This beautifully detailed array of Egyptian gods and goddess has a wonderful range of scenes going on all at once.

In the center is the King holding the crook and flail and wearing a bull’s tail. Horus and Anubis are adorning him. Horus, on the right, is wearing the double crown of Kingship and is the protector of the reigning King. Anubis, on the left, is related to death and mummification, and so he ensures one for the afterlife.

The two figures on the left of the papyrus are Sobek and Hathor. Hathor, the female goddess of love and music, is offering Sobek the menet necklace. This is a necklace that balanced in the front and back and so stood for the Ma’at, goddess of order, balance and justice. Sobek, the crocodile god, was connected with the sun god Re.

On the far right the two figures are Anuket and Isis. Anuket, seated on the throne, is the goddess of Aswan and the daughter of Re, the sun god. Isis is adorning her with lotus flowers, which symbolize resurrection and rebirth. She’s also holding a sistrum, a musical instrument that you shake like a rattle.


Hand Painted Papyrus of Gods, Goddesses and Kings
Hand Painted Papyrus of Gods, Goddesses and Kings

A beautiful array of Egyptian gods, goddesses and pharaohs.

Hand Painted Papyrus showing Homage to Isis
Hand Painted Papyrus Showing Homage to Isis

On the left of this beautiful scene, Queen Nefertari, wife of King Ramesses II, offers gifts to the Goddess Isis of love and beauty. On the right we see Isis again with Ma’at, Horus and Hathor. Ma’at is spreading her wings in protection to Isis.

Hand Painted Papyrus of the Judgement Scene
Hand Painted Papyrus Showing a Judgement Scene

The ancient Egyptians believed that, when they died, they would be judged on their behaviour during their lifetime before they could be granted a place in the Afterlife. This judgement ceremony was called the Weighing of the Heart. The ceremony was believed to have been performed in front of Osiris, the chief god of the dead and the Afterlife, and a tribunal of 42 dieties. A giant scale would weigh the deceased's heart against the principle of truth and justice (maat), represented by a feather, the symbol of the goddess of truth, order and justice, Maat. If the heart balanced against the feather then the deceased would be granted a place in the Fields of Hetep and Iaru. If it was heavy with the weight of wrongdoings, the balance would sink, and the heart would be grabbed and devoured by a terrifying beast that sat ready and waiting by the scales. This beast was Ammit ('the gobbler'), a composite animal with the head of a crocodile, the front legs and body of a lion or leopard and the back legs of a hippopotamus. Once the heart was devoured, the deceased would cease to exist - an idea which terrified the ancient Egyptians.

Hand Painted Papyrus of Maat
Hand Painted Papyrus of Maat

Maat was the personification of the fundamental order of the universe, without which all of creation would perish. The primary duty of the pharaoh was to uphold this order by maintaining the law and administering justice. To reflect this, many pharaohs took the title "Beloved of Maat," emphasizing their focus on justice and truth. At any event in which something would be judged, Maat was said to be present, and her name would be invoked so that the judge involved would rule correctly and impartially. Maat's presence in all worlds was universal, and all the gods deferred to her.

Hand Painted Papyrus of a Sarcophagus
Hand Painted Papyrus of a Sarcophagus

The term 'sarcophagus' is derived from the Greek word for 'flesh-eater'. This reflects the Hellenic belief that the type of stone used to make coffins actually consumed their contents.

Hand Painted Papyrus of the Voyage to Egypt
Hand Painted Papyrus of the Voyage to Egypt

This beautifully hand painted Egyptian papyrus shows various gods and goddesses making their voyage to Egypt.

Hand Painted Papyrus of the Weighing of the Heart Ceremony
Hand Painted Papyrus of the Weighing of the Heart Ceremony

The ancient Egyptians believed that, when they died, they would be judged on their behaviour during their lifetime before they could be granted a place in the Afterlife. This judgement ceremony was called the Weighing of the Heart. The ceremony was believed to have been performed in front of Osiris, the chief god of the dead and the Afterlife, and a tribunal of 42 dieties. A giant scale would weigh the deceased's heart against the principle of truth and justice (maat), represented by a feather, the symbol of the goddess of truth, order and justice, Maat. If the heart balanced against the feather then the deceased would be granted a place in the Fields of Hetep and Iaru. If it was heavy with the weight of wrongdoings, the balance would sink, and the heart would be grabbed and devoured by a terrifying beast that sat ready and waiting by the scales. This beast was Ammit ('the gobbler'), a composite animal with the head of a crocodile, the front legs and body of a lion or leopard and the back legs of a hippopotamus. Once the heart was devoured, the deceased would cease to exist - an idea which terrified the ancient Egyptians.

Hand Painted Papyrus of Winged Maat
Hand Painted Papyrus of Winged Ma'at

Maat was the personification of the fundamental order of the universe, without which all of creation would perish. The primary duty of the pharaoh was to uphold this order by maintaining the law and administering justice. To reflect this, many pharaohs took the title "Beloved of Maat," emphasizing their focus on justice and truth. At any event in which something would be judged, Maat was said to be present, and her name would be invoked so that the judge involved would rule correctly and impartially. Maat's presence in all worlds was universal, and all the gods deferred to her.

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